Chemistry

3.4 - Cimetidine - evolution of cimetidine

3.4 - Cimetidine - evolution of cimetidine


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Learning module: Thematic trip active ingredients

The Active Ingredients themed tour deals with the methods and techniques that have been used to develop new active ingredients and drugs over the past 100 to 150 years and those that are still used today. In order to illustrate the historical advancement in drug research and development, three very successful active ingredients of the past century are described in detail with regard to their development history and mode of action: the pain reliever aspirin, the ulcer therapeutic agent cimetidine and, using the example of zanamivir, the new generation of antiviral flu drugs.

The differences between historical and modern drug development, i.e. the way from trial and error (Aspirin) to the rational design of new drugs with the help of the most modern computer processes, chemical-analytical methods and microbiological techniques (Zanamivir). Cimetidine forms the link on this path and shows how rational methods have gradually found their way into drug research and how they have contributed to discovering more effective drugs through targeted variation of lead structures.

Target groups
In accordance with the pronounced interdisciplinary nature of this module, the Active Ingredients theme trip is aimed at chemists, biochemists, biologists, molecular biologists, virologists, pharmacists, medical professionals and others. The introductory pages to the individual examples in particular contain information that is understandable and interesting for laypeople.

Cimetidine

If you have any comments on the content of this article, you can inform the editors by e-mail. We read your letter, but we ask for your understanding that we cannot answer every one.

Dr. Andrea Acker, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Heinrich Bremer, Berlin
Prof. Dr. Walter Dannecker, Hamburg
Prof. Dr. Hans-Günther Däßler, Freital
Dr. Claus-Stefan Dreier, Hamburg
Dr. Ulrich H. Engelhardt, Braunschweig
Dr. Andreas Fath, Heidelberg
Dr. Lutz-Karsten Finze, Grossenhain-Weßnitz
Dr. Rudolf Friedemann, Halle
Dr. Sandra Grande, Heidelberg
Prof. Dr. Carola Griehl, Halle
Prof. Dr. Gerhard Gritzner, Linz
Prof. Dr. Helmut Hartung, Halle
Prof. Dr. Peter Hellmold, Halle
Prof. Dr. Günter Hoffmann, Eberswalde
Prof. Dr. Hans-Dieter Jakubke, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Thomas M. Klapötke, Munich
Prof. Dr. Hans-Peter Kleber, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Reinhard Kramolowsky, Hamburg
Dr. Wolf Eberhard Kraus, Dresden
Dr. Günter Kraus, Halle
Prof. Dr. Ulrich Liebscher, Dresden
Dr. Wolfgang Liebscher, Berlin
Dr. Frank Meyberg, Hamburg
Prof. Dr. Peter Nuhn, Halle
Dr. Hartmut Ploss, Hamburg
Dr. Dr. Manfred Pulst, Leipzig
Dr. Anna Schleitzer, Marktschwaben
Prof. Dr. Harald Schmidt, Linz
Dr. Helmut Schmiers, Freiberg
Prof. Dr. Klaus Schulze, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Rüdiger Stolz, Jena
Prof. Dr. Rudolf Taube, Merseburg
Dr. Ralf Trapp, Wassenaar, NL
Dr. Martina Venschott, Hanover
Prof. Dr. Rainer Vulpius, Freiberg
Prof. Dr. Günther Wagner, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Manfred Weissenfels, Dresden
Dr. Klaus-Peter Wendlandt, Merseburg
Prof. Dr. Otto Wienhaus, Tharandt


Mechanism of action

Cilengitide contains an RGD amino acid sequence. This sequence, consisting of the three amino acids arginine (R), glycine (G) and aspartic acid (D), mediates the binding to specific receptors, so-called integrins. Cilengitide inhibits the integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5 and is intended to prevent the formation and growth of the tumor's own blood vessels (angiogenesis) and thus the growth and spread of tumor cells. As a result, the blood supply is cut off, the tumor literally "starves" and can no longer form metastases. Some cancer cells even react very immediately to this substance and die (apoptosis). & # 913 & # 93


Even after a book has been published, the Elsevier team stays on the ball and puts additional extras online. So keep surfing by us, it's worth it.

Your Elsevier team wishes you lots of fun exploring the online worlds

If you take the 10th edition as an opportunity to compare it with the 1st edition from 1975, published by Wolfgang Forth, Dieter Henschler and Walter Rummel, then you are impressed. In the 34 years since 1975, basic research has expanded our knowledge in all areas of pharmacology and clinical research has transformed therapy.

In 1975 there was no section on receptor signal transduction in the General Pharmacology chapter. What followed the drug-receptor interaction was, with a few exceptions, a secret. After all, the chapter on noradrenaline and adrenaline showed a fat cell in which β-adrenoceptor agonists and glucagon activated adenylyl cyclase via their receptors. Adenosine-3 ‘, 5‘-monophosphate was discovered in 1957 as a second messenger, but that GTP-binding proteins mediate between receptor and enzyme was only recognized at the beginning of the 1980s. In 1975 there was also no section on clinical drug development in the General Pharmacology chapter. Although the thalidomide disaster is mentioned, it has not yet led to today's detailed rules for clinical testing, approval and pharmacovigilance. In 1975 there was no chapter on the pharmacology of blood vessels. What was to be said was for norepinephrine and adrenaline, as well as coronary insufficiency. The therapy of hypertension with noradrenaline and adrenaline was treated accordingly. Substances of first choice were diuretics, beta blockers, dihydralazine, reserpine and α-methyldopa. Neither calcium channel blockers nor ACE inhibitors nor angiotensin II receptor antagonists are mentioned. The first ACE inhibitor, captopril, was synthesized in 1975. Almost even more impressive, in the 1975 textbook, therapy for heart failure was limited to digitalis glycosides. For the treatment of peptic gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, only antacids and licorice were available in 1975. Cimetidine was about to be introduced, it wasn't until 1983 Helicobacter pylori discovered omeprazole, the first proton pump inhibitor, followed in 1989 a cure for ulcer disease through eradication therapy was still a long way off. In 1975 there was no chapter on bacterial toxins. It was unimagined that the botulinum neurotoxins would help clear up the exocytotic release of transmitters and would even be used as medicinal substances. At best, gene therapy was considered, because the first experimental gene transfer was just two years ago. There was no word on Alzheimer's disease, and of course, nothing on antiretroviral antivirals.

Stick to these examples. Conversely, the fact that some things from the 1st edition are missing in the 10th edition - no longer a section on statistics, a ganglion blocker instead of four, and even the only mentioned one, no analeptics - has not prevented the number from increasing considerably since 1975. The - beneficial - growth in knowledge has always been a challenge for the authors and editors over the ten editions. You have tried to keep the book understandable, memorable and stimulating by interlinking physiology / pathophysiology, pharmacology and clinical use, by harmonizing words and images. The authors, including eleven newcomers, and the editors hope that they have succeeded in doing the same with the 10th edition. We would like to thank the publisher, especially Ms. Sabine Schulz and Ms. Inga Dopatka, for helping us through some technical difficulties.

Freiburg im Breisgau, Mainz and Munich, September 2008

Klaus Aktories, Ulrich Förstermann, Franz Hofmann, Klaus Starke

According to the new licensing regulations for doctors, a “course in general pharmacology and toxicology”, a “course in special pharmacology” and accompanying lectures and seminars are planned to convey the subject matter of pharmacology and toxicology. A complete presentation of the area in teaching events cannot be achieved and would also not be desirable for didactic reasons. The student must therefore have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge required of him even if he is temporarily avoiding the lecture hall. In order to create the conditions for this with this book, the authors have adhered to the subjects of the subject catalogs when writing their chapter.

A brief explanation of the structure of the book should also serve as a guide to its use.

The authors and editors are very grateful to the numerous women involved for their tireless help in preparing the manuscripts. We would like to thank the publisher for providing the book with a generous amount of equipment. Dr. E. Hundt for his expert coordinative work and Mr. D. Kneifel for the graphic design of the extensive picture material.

editor

, Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories, Albert Ludwigs University, Institute for Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Albertstr. 25, 79104 Freiburg

, Prof. Dr. Ulrich Förstermann, Johannes Gutenberg University, Institute for Pharmacology, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, 55131 Mainz

, Prof. Dr. Franz Bernhard Hofmann, Technical University of Munich, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Biedersteiner Str. 29, 80802 Munich

, Prof. Dr. Klaus Starke, Albert Ludwig University, Institute for Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Albertstr. 25, 79104 Freiburg

, Prof. Dr. Clemens Allgaier, ACA-pharma concept GmbH, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig

, Dr. Holger Barth, Ulm University Hospital, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89081 Ulm

, Prof. Dr. Andreas Bechthold, Albert-Ludwigs-University, Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Stefan-Meier-Str. 19, 79104 Freiburg

, Prof. Dr. Martin Biel, Ludwig Maximilians University, Pharmacology for Natural Sciences, Center for Pharmaceutical Research, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich

, Prof. Dr. Heinz Bönisch, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Reuterstr. 2b, 53113 Bonn

, Prof. Dr. Regina Brigelius-Flohé, German Institute for Nutritional Research Potsdam Rehbrücke, Department of Biochemistry of Micronutrients, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114–116, 14558 Nuthetal

, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Dekant, Julius Maximilians University, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Versbacher Str. 9, 97078 Würzburg

, Prof. Dr. Hans-Christoph Diener, Essen University Hospital, Neurology Clinic, Hufelandstr. 55, 45147 Essen

, Prof. Dr. Karin Dilger, Albert Ludwig University, Medical Faculty, 79085 Freiburg

, Prof. Dr. Michel Eichelbaum, Chair of Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Tübingen, Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch Institute for Clinical Pharmacology, Auerbachstr. 112, 70376 Stuttgart

, PD Dr. Kristin Engelhard, Johannes Gutenberg University, Clinic for Anaesthesiology, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55131 Mainz

, Prof. Dr. Thomas Eschenhagen, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Center for Experimental Medicine, Institute for Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Martinistr. 52, 20246 Hamburg

, Prof. Dr. Thomas Feuerstein, Freiburg University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Neuropharmacology, Breisacher Str. 64, 79106 Freiburg

, Prof. Dr. Veit Flockerzi, Saarland University, Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, and Toxicology, Building 46, 66421 Homburg / Saar

, Prof. Dr. Manfred Göthert, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Reuterstr. 2b, 53113 Bonn

, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Gröbner, Zollernalb Clinic, Balingen Hospital, Academic Teaching Hospital of the University of Tübingen, Department of Internal Medicine, Tübinger Str. 30, 72336 Balingen

, Prof. Dr. Thomas Gudermann, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, Walther Straub Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Goethestr. 33, 80336 Munich

, Prof. Dr. Karl G. Hofbauer, Chair of Applied Pharmacology, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 50-70, CH-4056 Basel

, Prof. Dr. Dirk Hoffmeister, Friedrich Schiller University, Pharmaceutical Biology, Semmelweis-Str. 10, 07743 Jena

, Prof. Dr. Thomas Hohlfeld, Heinrich Heine University, Institute for Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology, Universitätsstr. 1 / Building 22.21, 40225 Düsseldorf

, Prof. Dr. Volker Höllt, Otto von Guericke University, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Leipziger Straße 44, 39120 Magdeburg

, Prof. Dr. Ingo Just, Hannover Medical School, Institute for Toxicology, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hanover

, Prof. Dr. Bernd Kaina, Johannes Gutenberg University, Institute for Toxicology, Dept. of Applied Toxicology, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, 55131 Mainz

, Prof. Dr. Christiane Keller, Ludwig Maximilians University, Medical Polyclinic Munich, Pettenkoferstr. 8a, 80336 Munich

, Prof. Dr. Heinz Kilbinger, Johannes Gutenberg University, Institute for Pharmacology, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, 55131 Mainz

, Prof. Dr. Hartmut Kleinert, Johannes Gutenberg University, Institute for Pharmacology, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, 55101 Mainz

, Prof. Dr. Hartmut Lode, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Benjamin Franklin Campus, Institute for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Garystr. 5, 14195 Berlin

, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Maier, Clinic and Polyclinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn

, Prof. Dr. Dietrich Mebs, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe University, Center for Forensic Medicine, Institute for Forensic Toxicology, Kennedyallee 104, 60596 Frankfurt

, Prof. Dr. Hanns Möhler, University and ETH Zurich, Institute for Pharmacology, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zurich

, Dr. Elke Oetjen, University Medicine Göttingen, Center Pharmacology and Toxicology, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075 Göttingen

, Prof. Dr. Uwe Panten, Technical University of Braunschweig, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Mendelssohnstr. 1, 38106 Braunschweig

, Prof. Dr. Ingo Rustenbeck, Technical University of Braunschweig, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Mendelssohnstr. 1, 38106 Braunschweig

, Prof. Dr. Hansjörg Schild, Johannes Gutenberg University, Institute for Immunology, Obere Zahlbacher Str. 67, 55131 Mainz

, Prof. Dr. Eberhard Schlicker, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität, Institute for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Reuterstr. 2b, 53113 Bonn

, Prof. Dr. Karsten Schrör, Heinrich Heine University, Institute for Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology, Universitätsstr. 1 / Building 22.21, 40225 Düsseldorf

, Prof. Dr. Rolf Schubert, Albert Ludwig University, Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hermann-Herder-Str. 9, 79104 Freiburg

, Prof. Dr. Matthias Schwab, Chair of Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Tübingen, Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute for, Clinical Pharmacology, Auerbachstr. 112, 70376 Stuttgart

, Prof. Dr. Dr. H. c. Hans-Günther Sonntag, Ruprecht-Karls-University, Institute for Hygiene, Im Neuenheimer Feld 324, 69120 Heidelberg

, Prof. Dr. Ulrich Speck, Charité University Hospital, Institute for Radiology, Charité-Platz 1, 10098 Berlin

, Prof. Dr. Ralf Stahlmann, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Benjamin Franklin Campus, Institute for Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Garystr. 5, 14195 Berlin

, Prof. Dr. H.J. Steinfelder, University Medicine Göttingen, Center for Pharmacology and Toxicology, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075 Göttingen

, Prof. Dr. Klaus Turnheim, Medical University of Vienna, Center for Biomolecular Medicine and Pharmacology, Institute for Pharmacology, Währinger Str. 13 a, A-1090 Vienna

, Prof. Dr. Clemens Unger, Clinic for Tumor Biology, Clinic for Internal Oncology, Breisacher Str. 117, 79106 Freiburg

, Prof. Dr. Spiros Vamvakas, European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products, Human Medicine Evaluation Unit, 7 Westferry Circus, Canary Wharf, GB London E14 4HB

, Prof. Dr. Ingeborg Walter-Sack, University of Heidelberg, Medical University Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine VI, Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacoepidemiology, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg

, Prof. Dr. Artur-Aron Weber, Institute for Pharmacology, University of Duisburg-Essen, University Clinic Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen

, Prof. Dr. Christian Werner, Johannes Gutenberg University, Clinic for Anaesthesiology, Langenbeckstr. 1, 55101 Mainz

, Prof. Dr. Siegfried Wolffram, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Institute for Animal Nutrition and Metabolic Physiology, Olshausenstr. 40, 24098 Kiel

, Dr. Peter Wollenberg, Saarland University, Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, and Toxicology, Building 46, 66421 Homburg / Saar


Illumina

The Lassaigne digestion is a simple method of elemental analysis with which the presence of sulfur, nitrogen and halogen (except fluorine) in organic substances can be detected. He was made by the French chemist Jean Louis Lassagine (1800-1859) who was also a pharmacist and focused on forensic chemistry.


Material / devices:

Several small test tubes (10 mm diameter), glass rod, wide test tube (100x20 mm), tweezers, test tube holder, alcohol burner, small funnel with filter, test tubes 100x16 mm, pipettes


Chemicals:

sodium
Ferrous sulfate
Hydrochloric acid 25% p.a.
Nitric acid 25% p.a.
Silver nitrate solution 5%
Ammonia solution 25%
Sodium pentacyanonitrosyl ferrate (II) (sodium nitroprusside)
Dichloromethane
Potassium permanganate
Oxalic acid
Hydrogen peroxide solution 3%

various organic substances to be analyzed


Safety instructions:

The digestion should be carried out in a fume cupboard. It is essential to wear protective goggles! If the substance to be analyzed is unknown, a violent reaction must be expected. Do not use more than the amounts given here!


Carrying out the experiment:

Small pieces of sodium are required for the digestion. The best thing to do is to melt some sodium under petroleum and add 2-3 drops of isopropanol (to remove any crusts) in a test tube, remove the molten metal with a heated (!) Pipette and drop it into a bowl with cold petroleum solidified into spheres 3-5 mm in diameter.

For the digestion, about 20-30 mg of the well-dried substance to be analyzed is used, which is roughly the amount that covers the bottom of a small test tube with a diameter of 10 mm. With the help of tweezers and a stick, a sodium ball is pushed in front of the substance. Petroleum residues have been removed beforehand by carefully dabbing with absorbent paper. The test tube is held at a slight angle and slowly heated from top to bottom until the sodium melts. Then you hold it at an angle and heat the substance on which the molten sodium has fallen. If the sample contains plenty of oxygen, a carboxyl group or even oxidizing groups (nitro groups) are present, a small fire phenomenon can occur. Sometimes the reaction mixture foams and rises a little in the test tube. There is always extensive charring. After the visible reaction has subsided, the test tube is heated for approx. 2 minutes from all sides until it becomes dark red in order to completely destroy the organic substance, which is particularly important with colored substances, of which no residues must remain undecomposed would later make the recognition of the color reactions more difficult. An alcohol burner is sufficient for this.

After sufficient heating, the test tube is dropped into a prepared large test tube containing 6 ml of water. The small test tube shatters or at least cracks. If there is unreacted sodium, a somewhat more violent reaction can also occur here (keep a safe distance!). As a rule, the bottom of the small glass shatters into splinters, which you detach from each other with the help of a glass rod, after which you can pull out the upper part. The contents are briefly boiled and then filtered through a small filter. The glass splinters are boiled again with 2 ml of water and this is also passed through the filter. The filtrate is clear and usually colorless when it has been sufficiently calcined. It is divided into three test tubes of 2 ml each.

For the first part you add 1-2 drops of a 2.5% solution of nitroprusside sodium (prepare fresh daily!). When the analyte sulfur contains an intense purple-red color. If the solution remains colorless or only turns yellow, sulfur is absent

For the second part, put a spatula tip of iron (II) sulfate and briefly heat it to the boil. The iron carbonate / hydroxide formed creates a cloudy green-gray broth. It is allowed to cool slightly, if necessary diluted with 1-2 ml of water and then 25% hydrochloric acid is added dropwise. In the presence of nitrogen A dark blue color develops in the analysis substance and Prussian blue may separate out in flakes. If nitrogen is absent, only a clear, yellow solution is obtained. In case of doubt (yellow-green?) Add a few drops of 3% hydrogen peroxide, which increases the formation of Prussian blue.

The third part of the filtrate is acidified with 1 ml of 25% nitric acid and, after setting a boiling rod, boiled for at least three minutes, about half of the liquid evaporating. This can release (very small amounts) hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, which is why cooking should be done under the hood. Then fill up with 2 ml of water, add a drop of nitric acid and finally 2-3 drops of 5% silver nitrate solution. Contained the substance to be analyzed halogen so a dense precipitate of silver chloride, bromide or iodide falls out.
This proof has its pitfalls! Minimal opalescent cloudiness can be found again and again and is not conclusive. When boiling with nitric acid, elemental sulfur may precipitate out as a milky, opalescent cloudiness. If you do not cook enough and there are residues of sulfide or cyanide in the solution, a white or yellow-brown cloudiness of silver cyanide, respectively. sulfide arise. If necessary, ammonia solution is added dropwise until the reaction mixture smells like it, and it is briefly boiled. It is then filtered and the clear filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. If the sample contained chloride (bromide and iodide do not dissolve sufficiently in ammonia!), A precipitate will again occur.

If you suspect the presence of bromine or iodine - e.g. if the silver halide precipitate appears yellowish - the following sample is connected: Dissolve a small spatula tip of potassium permanganate (20-30 mg) in 1 ml of nitric acid (25%) and add 1 ml of the Lassaigne filtrate and let stand for 1-2 minutes. Then add 1 ml of dichloromethane and shake the mixture well for ½ minute. Now a spatula tip of oxalic acid (20 mg) is added and shaken again until the aqueous phase has discolored (the color only turns brown to add a little more oxalic acid). A slight evolution of gas (carbon dioxide) occurs, which is why the stopper has to be briefly ventilated in the meantime. Finally, it is left to stand until the phases separate. In the presence of bromine, the lower (organic) phase is yellow to brown, in the presence of iodine it is purple. If it is colorless, neither iodine nor bromine are present.

In my experiments, I tested the following substances and made various observations:

Quinine (C.20H24N2O2): 20 mg were used. The filtrate was slightly yellow-brown in color. Yellowing only with nitroprusside. With iron sulfate and hydrochloric acid, a strong precipitate of Berlin blue. With silver nitrate, discrete cloudiness (only briefly boiled with nitric acid, probably silver cyanide): Sulfur negative, nitrogen positive, halogen negative

Diclofenac (C.14H11Cl2NO2): 25 mg used. No staining with nitroprusside. Clear blue coloration with iron sulfate and hydrochloric acid. Dense white precipitate with silver nitrate: Sulfur negative, nitrogen positive, halogen positive

Sulfanilic acid (C.6H7NO3S): 25 mg reacted during the digestion with the appearance of fire. Intense violet coloration with nitroprusside. Strong blue coloration with iron sulfate and hydrochloric acid. Opalescent turbidity when boiled with nitric acid, brownish-yellow precipitate with silver nitrate, which did not reappear after dissolving in ammonia, boiling, filtering and supersaturating with nitric acid: Sulfur positive, nitrogen positive, halogen negative

Thiamine chloride (C.12H17ClN4OS): 20 mg used. Strong violet coloration with nitroprusside. Strong blue coloration with iron sulfate and hydrochloric acid. With silver nitrate thick white precipitate: Sulfur positive, nitrogen positive, halogen positive

Cimetidine (C.10H16N6S): 20 mg were used. Strong violet coloration with nitroprusside. Strong blue coloration with iron sulfate and hydrochloric acid. With silver nitrate only a minimal opalescent haze was created: Sulfur positive, nitrogen positive, halogen negative

Eosin (C.20H6Br4N / A2O5): 20 mg were digested. No staining with nitroprusside. Clear yellow solution with iron sulfate and hydrochloric acid. With silver nitrate thick, creamy white precipitate: Sulfur negative, nitrogen negative, halogen positive
When performing the potassium permanganate sample, the DCM layer turned yellow: Bromine detection

Fructose (C.6H12O6): when 40 mg of the substance is heated with sodium, there is a clear appearance of fire and a caramel odor, slightly yellow-brown filtrate. With nitroprusside only yellowing. Clear yellow solution with iron sulfate and hydrochloric acid. Minimal opalescence with silver nitrate: Sulfur negative, nitrogen negative, halogen negative

The silver-containing solutions are recycled, the remaining solutions are disposed of with the wastewater. The leftover glass goes into the household waste. Dichloromethane is separated off and added to the halogen-containing organic waste


Explanations:

Heating with sodium destroys the organic matter. Under the prevailing, strongly reducing conditions, sodium cyanide is formed from nitrogen and carbon, sodium sulfide from organically bound sulfur and the corresponding halides from halogen. In addition, sodium carbonate is formed and when it is dissolved in water, if not all of the sodium has been converted, sodium hydroxide is formed. The products are then detected by characteristic color reactions:

Detection of sulfur with nitroprusside:

In a moderately alkaline solution, sulfide ions form a deep purple compound with pentacyanonitrosyl ferrate (II) (pentacyanonitrosyolsulfoferrate (II)):

This very sensitive and specific sulphide detection should not occur in a strongly alkaline solution, which is why as much sodium as possible should be converted. I carried it out on a trial basis in 0.5 N sodium hydroxide solution with a trace of sodium sulfide solution: it turned out to be very positive. The purple color persists for a long time and only fades to a dirty green over the course of a few hours. In the presence of a lot of nitrogen one could fear that the sulphide in the melt will convert to thiocyanate and escape detection. So I checked cimetidine (molar ratio N: S = 6: 1). The sulphide detection was absolutely positive.


Proof of nitrogen as Berlin blue:

The cyanide ions present in the solution and iron (II) ions in an alkaline medium form the well-known yellow blood liquor salt, hexacyanoferrate (II)

In this way, potassium hexacyanoferrate was first obtained, which is also evidenced by the name: animal waste (remains of the slaughterhouse) was annealed with iron filings in the absence of air and the residue extracted with potash solution. The yellow "blood-lye salt" then crystallized out of the lye.

When acidified, the hexacyanoferrate forms the well-known Berlin blue with excess iron:

The iron (III) ions required for this arise spontaneously through the oxidation of iron (II) with atmospheric oxygen. If necessary, you can help a little by adding hydrogen peroxide:

2 Fe 2+ + H2O2 + 2 H + → 2 Fe 3+ + 2 H2O

This evidence is also sensitive and specific. According to the literature, it can fail with "highly volatile nitrogen" or with sulfur-rich compounds due to the formation of thiocyanate and the test should then be repeated using more sodium. I did not have such a connection. Eventually, thiocyanate could also be detected after adding hydrogen peroxide by shaking it out with ether, the iron (III) thiocyanate turning the ether layer red.


Halogen detection with silver nitrate:

Halides (except fluoride) with silver nitrate in nitric acid solution result in the well-known sparingly soluble silver halide precipitates, here using the example of chloride:

Any sulphide and cyanide present must first be eliminated by extensive boiling with nitric acid. In ammonia, silver chloride (and partially also the bromide) is soluble to form the diammine complex, while silver sulfide and cyanide remain undissolved. If it is filtered off and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid, silver chloride precipitates again in the presence of chloride:

The detection of bromine and iodine is based on the oxidation of the halides by potassium permanganate in acidic solution. The free halogens are shaken out in dichloromethane, which they give a characteristic color. Excess permanganate in the aqueous phase is destroyed with oxalic acid.

10 Br - + 16 H + + 2 MnO4 - → 2 Mn 2+ + 5 Br2 + 8 H.2O


Sodium globules of the appropriate size


Amounts used


Loaded test tube


glow


Undressing in water. The small test tube often bursts immediately. Here it just cracked to crackles, so you have to help with a glass rod.


Filter. Here a slightly colored filtrate, which indicates insufficiently long glow.


Failure of reaction with thiamine chloride: all reactions positive (from left to right sulfur sample, nitrogen sample, halide sample)


Failure to react with fructose: all reactions negative


Reaction failure with sulfanilic acid: only sulfur and nitrogen positive


Failure to react with diclofenac: only nitrogen and halogen positive


Reaction failure with eosin: only halogen positive


Detection of bromide in the filtrate of the eosin digestion after oxidation with permanganate: lower phase (DCM) colored yellow-brown. To the right of the reaction failure with silver nitrate.

Kovar K-A. and Ruf C.O.L .: Auterhoff / Kovar: Identification of Drugs 6th Edition 1998, Wissenschaftliche Verlagsgesellschaft mbH Stuttgart, ISBN 3-8047-1554-0

"Everything should be made as simple as possible. But not easier." (A. Einstein 1871-1955)

"If you only understand chemistry, you don't really understand it either!" (G.C. Lichtenberg, 1742 - 1799)

"The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of the people who have never seen the world." (Alexander v. Humboldt, 1769 - 1859)


Income plan CDL

CDL chlorine dioxide solution - make it yourself

Solution to kill all parasites

The red blood cells are the most common cells in the blood. They are used to carry oxygen from the lungs to various cells throughout the body. They are also used to remove combustion residues such as CO². The red blood cells change through smartphones, WLAN, or cell phones. They lie on top of each other and form long lines. The first picture, made with a dark field microscope, clearly shows the roll formation. This sticking, also known as blood clumping or roll formation, significantly reduces the surface area. Oxygen can only be absorbed to a limited extent. The blood becomes thick and the body becomes inadequate with oxygen

supplied, and CO² is poorly disposed of.

There is an insufficient supply of oxygen and the cells acidify. Immediately after the first picture, where the roll formation is clearly visible, 3 drops of CDL of 0.3% were drunk with a glass of water. The second picture, just 10 minutes later, shows very clearly how the blood clots have dissolved. This effect is not unique. Without exception, all test participants had the same success. The non-sticky red blood cells can now carry the oxygen from the lungs to the

transport different cells throughout the body and remove the combustion residues such as CO² again.

CDL consists of demineralized water in which the distilled gas of sodium chlorite NaClO2 (not to be confused with sodium chloride NaCl the common salt), which has been activated with hydrochloric acid, is bound. CDL eliminates viruses, bacteria, single-celled and small parasites, spores, microbes, some types of fungi and worms through oxidation. Then chlorine dioxide breaks down into water, oxygen and a tiny amount of salt. Before opening the CDL for the first time, it should be cooled down in the refrigerator to below 11 degrees Celsius, otherwise the gas can escape from the bottle.

CDL is not to be confused with MMS (Miracle Mineral Supplement). While MMS is in the acidic pH range, pH 2.5-3, CDL is almost pH neutral and is pH 5.5-7, so much more tolerable and can be tolerated very well in much higher and independent doses.

The chlorine in chlorine dioxide is just as harmless to humans as, for example, common table salt that contains chlorine Cl. One should not confuse chlorine dioxide applications with chlorination, this would be harmful.

Chlorine dioxide has been used as a bactericidal disinfectant in the food industry for over a hundred years.

In 1999 the American Society for Analytical Chemistry announced that chlorine dioxide was the most effective bacteria killer known to man.

CDL is an oxidant that removes all harmful (pathogenic) bacteria, viruses, parasites, worms and fungi after just a few minutes

(such as the yeast Candida) and acidic cells (cancer cells) in humans are killed (oxidized) and transported naturally out of the body.

Chlordioxid überwindet auch die Blut-Hirn-Schranke und kann somit auch dort Parasiten, Viren, Pilze, Bakterien und Schwermetalle erreichen, oxidieren und aus-scheiden. Chlordioxid bleibt im Körper nicht länger als zwölf Stunden aktiv, danach zerfällt es zu Tafelsalz NaCl, und ungeladenem Sauerstoff (was den Bauch etwas aufblähen lässt) was wichtig für ein gesundes Immunsystem ist. CDL zerstört aber nur pathogenen Erregern und Mikroben, deren pH-Wert unter 7 liegt, die also sauer und für den Menschen schädlichen sind.

Bakterien, Parasiten, Protozoen, Pilzstämme können mit uns lange Zeit unauffällig in Symbiose leben, aber in übersäuertem oder radioaktiven Milieu entarten sie, und vermehren sich dann unkontrolliert im Menschen.

Die normalerweise friedlichen Parasiten werden bei Änderung des Milieus höchst schädlich und verursachen je nach Schwäche:

Diabetes, Arthritis, Thromben, Herzinfarkt, Multiple Sklerose, Krebs und weiter Krankheiten.

CDL von 0,3 % enthält nur noch das Gas vom Chlordioxid, ohne die Säure, und gilt als natürliches Wasserdesinfektionsmittel. Vor dem Gebrauch muss Chlordioxid im Kühl-schrank aufbewahrt sein. Über 11°C verliert die Chlordioxid das Gas und damit auch die Wirkung. Ungeöffnet kann das Chlordioxid Fläschchen auch in der Wärme gelagert oder transportiert werden.

Ein Bekannter empfahl uns CDL, das ihn vom Rückenleiden und Hautkrebs befreit hat. Wir testeten Chlordioxid und begannen mit der

empfohlen Entgiftungs-Kur die ca. 4 Wochen dauert.

Damit nicht das Essen im Magen oxidiert wird, nahmen wir auf nüchtern Magen morgens und abends vor dem Schlafen ca. 10 Tropfen Chlordioxid mit 2 dl Leitungs-wasser, und erhöhten jeden Tag die Dosis um 2-4 Tropfen bis auf ca. 50 Tropfen.

Bei der Einnahme behalten wir vor jeden Schlucken ca. 10 Sekunden im Mund, dadurch gelangt das Chlordioxid sehr gut über die Mundschleimhaut in die Blutbahn.

Krankheitserreger, die durch die Anwendung von Chlordioxid abgetötet werden, können den Körper nur über die Leber verlassen, die sie abbaut. Das funktioniert, bis man an eine vorübergehende Übelkeitsschwelle stösst.

Übelkeit oder Durchfall ist ein Zeichen dafür, dass Chlordioxid mehr Erreger abtötet, als abgebaut werden können. In diesem Fall setzten wir einen Tag aus und begannen wieder mit je 2–4 Tropfen weniger.

Erstverschlechterungen erkannten wir als ein Zeichen von einer Entgiftung.

Bei einer Erkältung hatte meine Frau immer eine verstopfte Nase. Während der Einnahme von Chlordioxid bekam sie Symptome einer Grippe mit verstopfter Nase. Schon am gleichen Tag wurde die Nase frei und eine braune Flüssigkeit floss heraus. Seither hatte sie nie mehr eine verstopfte Nase. Während der Entgiftungs-Kur hatte sie zum ersten Mal nach 20 Jahren bei einer längeren Wanderung keine Fussgelenkschmerzen mehr, obwohl sie fast keinen Knorpel im Fussgelenk hatte.

Ich hatte seit einigen Monaten Sinusitis (Stirn- und Nasenne-benhöhlenentzündung). Vieles was früher dagegen geholfen hat, nützte diesmal nichts. Während der Entgiftungs-Kur mit Chlordioxid war innert wenigen Tagen die Stirn- und Nasennebenhöhlenentzündung weg.

Auch Hautausschläge sind nach einigen Voll-Bädern mit ca. 100 Tropfen Chlordioxid verschwunden. Nach einer Entfiftungs-Kur die wir jedes Jahr einmal machen, nehmen wir zur Vorbeugung 2–3 Mal pro Woche morgends nach dem Aufstehen, oder abends vor dem Schlafen ge-hen ca. 50 Tropfen mit 2 dl Leitungswasser.Um die Rückstände von der Oxidation durch Chlordio-xid besser aus dem Körper zu leiten, nehmen wir ca. 30 Minuten nach dem Chlordioxid 1 Teelöffel Zeolith-Pulver (Klinoptilolith) mit 2dl Wasser.

Zeolith-Pulver kann Fäulnis- und Gärungsgifte im Darm entfernen und die Darmfunktion anregen, das Säure-Basen-Gleichgewicht regulieren, das Immunsystem unterstützen, Entzündungsprozesse hemmen, Schwermetall, Quecksilber, Blei, Amalgam, Schadstoffe, Toxine, medikamentöse Gifte, Schlacken binden und mit dem Stuhlgang ausscheiden, den Einfluss auf

Nahrungsmittelunverträglichkeiten begünstigen, die Versorgung des Organismus mit essentiellen Stoffen optimieren und Wundheilung fördern, indem man Zeolith mit Wasser zu einem Brei knetet und auf die Wunde aufträgt. Nach der Einnahme von Zeolith warten wir 30 Minuten bevor wir eine Mahlzeit nehmen.

Weil Chlordioxid durch die Oxitationsäure schlechte Zellen abtötet, nehmen wir vor jeder Mahlzeit hochdosierte Antioxidantien: Hochdosierte Vitaminen, Mineralien, Aminosäuren und Spurenelementen, damit der Körper gesunde Zellen produzieren kann. Hierfür nehmen wir die Basis-Kombination:

Vitacor Plus und Dr. Rath’s Phytobiologicals.

Es ist ein tägliches Nahrungsergänzungsmittel für jeden Mann und jede Frau vom heranwachsenden bis ins hohe Alter. Es enthält eine Kombination von über 30 Inhaltsstoffen u.a. aus Vitaminen, Aminosäuren, Mineralien und Spurenelementen in synergistischer Zusammensetzung.

Diese Grundformel fördert den Zellaufbau und Zellschutz, unterstützt wichtige Funktionen des Stoffwechsels jeder einzelnen Zelle des menschlichen Körpers und gibt ihnen eine Basisversorgung an Bioenergie, und dient zur Unterstützung der Energiebereitstellung für körperliche und geistige Leistungsfähigkeit.

Bei einer Grippe, einer Infektion oder Entzündung jeglicher Art geben wir ca. 50 Tropfen Chlordioxid in ein Glas, füllen es mit einem Schluck Wasser, geben gleichviel Tropfen DMSO dazu, und lassen die Flüssigkeit ca. 2-3 Minute im Mund, bevor wir alles ausspucken. Dadurch können im Mund und Rachen alle Bakterien und Viren abgetötet werden, die sich bei einer Grippe vor allem in diesem Bereich befinden.

Dies wiederholen wir 3 – 4 mal und alle 2 – 3 Stunden und dies täglich bis zur Heilung.

DMSO ist die Abkürzung von Dimenthylsulfoxid was eine natürliche Schwefelverbindung ist, die entscheidend die Wirksamkeit vieler Mittel verbessert. Als Transmitter transportiert DMSO die Wirk-stoffe schneller und tiefer in den Körper und bis in die Zellen, wie z.B. bei den inneren und äusseren Chlordioxid-Anwendungen. DMSO hat eine entwässernde, entzündungs-hemmende und schmerzlindernde Wirkung, und hilft bei Durchblutungsstörungen, Entzündungen, Hautausschlägen, Allergien, Schuppen-flechte, Neurodermitis, Gelenk- und Muskelschmerzen, offene Wunden und fördert die Wund- und Narbenheilung.

Die Haut ist nicht nur als grösstes Ausscheidungsorgan des Menschen, sondern funktioniert ebenfalls als flächenmässig grösstes Aufnahmeorgan. Chlordioxid reinigt den Körper von Erregern, die sich auf der Haut oder unmittelbar darun-ter befinden. Diesen äusseren Körperbereich zu reinigen verhindern, dass das innere Entgiftungssystem überfordert wird. Erreger, die nahe der Hautoberfläche abgetötet werden, werden direkt über die Haut abtransportiert. Dabei hören wir auch nicht auf Chlordioxid innerlich einzunehmen.

Für ein Vollbad geben wir ca. 100 Tropfen Chlordioxid-Lösung und ca. 100 Tropfen DMSO in ein warmes Badewasser von ca. 37 Grad, und baden darin ca. 20 Minuten. Für ein Teilbad geben wir ca. 50 Tropfen Chlordioxid-Lösung auf 1 Liter Wasser und gleich-viel Tropfen DMSO.

Bei Gelenk- oder Muskel-schmerzen geben wir ca. 15 Tropfen Chlordioxid-Lösung und gleichviel Tropfen DMSO in ein Trinkglas, füllten es bo-denbedeckt mit Wasser, und verteilen die Flüssigkeit auf die schmerzhaften Stellen.Bei Pickel waschen wir das Gesicht mit 15 Tropfen Chlor-dioxid-Lösung und gleichviel Tropfen DMSO auf 1 dl Wasser.Gegen Karies oder Zahn-fleischentszündung spülen wir nach dem Zähneputzen mit 15 Tropfen Chlordioxid-Lösung und gleichviel Tropfen DMSO auf 1 dl Wasser ca. 1 Minute den Mund.Viele legen ihre Dritten Zähneüber Nacht in ein Glas und geben ca. 5 – 10 Trofpen Chlor-dioxid und 2 dl Wasser hinzu.Viele Menschen haben einen gestörten Stoffwechsel durch krankheitsfördernde Darm-bakterien und der Belastung durch Pilzerkrankungen. Durch jahrelange nährstoff-arme Nahrungsmittel und che-mischen Zusatzstoffen belastet, hat der Darm seine normale Bewegungstätigkeit verloren. Alte Nahrungsreste werden zu verhärteten Substanzen, die sich ablagern und den Weitertransport des restlichen Darminhaltes erschweren. Dadurch kann es zu einer Selbstvergiftung des Körpers kommen, was der Grund von verminderte Vitalität, Müdig-keit, Konzentrationsmangel, Infektionskrankheiten, Ent-zündungen, Rheuma, Neu-rodermitis, Schuppenflechte, Migräne, Allergien, Herz-Kreislaufbeschwerden und hoher Blutdruck sein kann.

Mit einer Darmreinigung kann der Darm von den Giftstoffen befreit werden, und seine normale Tätigkeit wieder aufnehmen. Am Vortag essen wir bis zum Mittag Früchte (gut sind Trauben), oder Sauerkraut, oder Spinat, damit der Darm gut entleert wird. Vor der Darmreinigung trinken wir genügend Grüntee und beginnt mit dem Einlauf mit einem Irrigator, einem speziell für die Darmreinigung gemachten Set. Wir geben ca. 30 Tropfen Chlordioxid-Lösung in das Becke, füllen es mit lauwarmen Wasser und geben gleichviel Tropfen DMSO dazu. Wir hängen den Behälter erhöht auf, damit die Flüssigkeit gut in den Darm hinein fliessen kann. In der Badewanne oder in der Dusche in Knielage, mit dem Oberkörper gebeugt, führen wir das Klisterrohr (mit Oliven- oder Kokusöl gleitfähig gemacht) in den Darmausgang. Anschliessend lassen wir langsam die ganz Flüssigkeit in den Darm einfliessen.

Danach behalten wir die Flüssigkeit so lange wie möglich ca. 10 Minuten im Darm, indem wir im Bett abwechslungs-weise auf allen Seiten liegen, damit die Flüssigkeit tief in den Darm eindringen kann. Danach entleeren wir den Darminhalt in die Toilette, und Unterstützung dies mit einer leichten Bauchmassage in der Uhrzeigerrichtung. Bis alle Flüssigkeit aus dem Darm ist kann dies bis zu 15-30 Minu-ten dauern. Dies wiederholen wir 2-3 Mal und bei einer Krankheit wiederholen wir die Darmreinigung jeden zweiten Tag bis zur Heilung.Im Jahr 1997 machte der Ingenieur und Goldsucher Jim Hum-bleeine Expedition im Dschungel von Guyana (Südamerika). Dabei erkrankte ein Begleiter an Malaria. Das einzige, was sie mitführten war „Stabilisierter Sauerstoff“ ein seit 1929 bekanntes und hochwirksames Mittel zur Wasserdesinfektion. In seiner Not flösste Jim Hum-ble dem von Malaria erkranken Begleiter eine Dosis dieses Desinfektionsmittels ein. Zu seiner grossen Überraschung ging das hohe Fieber eine Stunde später deutlich zurück und nach weiteren vier Stunden war der Betreffende vollkommen symptomfrei. Auch Jim Humble infizierte sich mit Malaria, was ein Bluttest im Spital wo er sich untersuchen lies bestätigte. Statt die verordneten Malariapillen zu schlucken, trank Jim Humble ebenfalls Wasser mit dem Wasserdesinfektionsmittel. Schon nach wenigen Stunden fühlte er sich genesen. Der anderntags im Krankenhaus erneut durchgeführte Malariatest erwies sich als negativ. Nach diesem guten Ergebnis fand Jim Huble in vielen Tests heraus, was Experten schon lange wussten, daß nämlich ein ganz ähnliches Molekül eine noch viel stärkere oxi-dative Wirkung besitzt als stabilisierter Sauerstoff: Es ist das aus einem Chlor- und zwei Sauerstoffatomen bestehende Chlordioxid.Ab dem Jahr 2000 verabreichte Jim Humble zusammen mit vielen Ärzten in Afrika, Chlor-dioxid an Malariapatienten. Mittlerweile sind über 75’000 Malaria-Fälle durch Chlor-dioxid überwunden worden, was zahlreiche offizielle Dan-kesschreiben aus Tansania, Malawi, Kenia, Uganda und anderen Ländern bezeugen. Im ostafrikanischen Malawi hat die Regierung Chlordioxid offiziell als Mineralienpräparat zugelassen, das allen zur Ein-nahme frei steht. Dort führte man in einem Gefängnis eine wissenschaftlich kontrollierte klinische Studie mit Chlordi-oxid an Aids-Kranken durch, die eine Erfolgsrate von 99 Prozent aufwies! Viele Menschen in der ganzen Welt sind schon durch

Chlordioxid von verschiedenen Krank-heiten geheilt worden. Eine junge Australierin mit Lungenkrebs im Endstadium konnte 11 Tage nach der Ein-nahme von Chlordioxid das Bett ohne fremde Hilfe verlassen, und nach einem Monat konnte sie wieder in der Schule unterrichten. Heute ist sie geheilt

.CDL ist ein natürliches Wasserdesinfektionsmittel, dass jeder mit eigener Verantwortung zur Vorbeugung, oder zur Unterstützung bei Krankheiten benutzen kann.


Diagnosis

In der klinischen Diagnostik äußert sich die Erkrankung durch Pityriasis versicolor-ähnliche Flecken, flache warzige Papeln und durch Karzinome der Haut. Die Patienten zeigen flache, leicht schuppige, rot-braune Flecken im Gesicht, am Hals und Körper, oder warzenartige Läsionen wie bei Papillomen oder wie bei seborrhoischer Keratose und rosa-rote Papeln an den Händen, oberen und unteren Extremitäten und im Gesicht. Generell sind die Hautläsionen über den ganzen Körper verbreitet, aber es gibt einige Fälle mit nur wenigen Veränderungen, die auf eine Extremität beschränkt sind. Ζ] Η]

Die benigne (d.h.gutartige) Form der Epidermodysplasia verruciformis zeigt sich nur durch flächige, warzenartige Läsionen am Körper, während die maligne (d.h. bösartige) Form durch eine höhere Rate an polymorphen Hautveränderungen und die Entwicklung verschiedener Hautkrebsarten gekennzeichnet ist.


Magengeschwür: Ursachen und Risikofaktoren

Psychische Faktoren: „Bei so viel Stress bekommst du früher oder später ein Magengeschwür“ – solche Warnungen hört man häufiger. Tatsächlich scheint Stress im beruflichen oder privaten Umfeld das Risiko für ein Magengeschwür zu erhöhen. Das liegt vermutlich daran, dass der Körper bei anhaltendem Stress übermäßig viel Magensäure produziert, während er gleichzeitig weniger schützenden Schleim herstellt.

Auch akute Stress- oder Schocksituationen sowie Depressionen scheinen die Entstehung von Magengeschwüren zu begünstigen. Alleinige Auslöser sind sie jedoch mit hoher Wahrscheinlichkeit nicht. Vielmehr wirken sie nur in Kombination mit anderen Risikofaktoren geschwürauslösend.

Zu viel Magensäure: Ein Magengeschwür entsteht, wenn sich die aggressive Magensäure und die schützenden Faktoren der Magenschleimhaut (zum Beispiel Schleim und Säure-neutralisierende Salze) im Ungleichgewicht befinden. Ist die Säure zu stark oder sind die schützenden Faktoren zu schwach, wird die Schleimhaut geschädigt und ein Magengeschwür kann entstehen. Durch ein solches Ungleichgewicht entzündet sich zuerst die Magenschleimhaut (Gastritis). Hält die Entzündung längere Zeit an oder kehrt sie immer wieder, kann sich mit der Zeit ein Magengeschwür entwickeln.

Gestörte Abläufe im Magen: Auch gestörte Magenbewegungen stehen im Verdacht, ein Magengeschwür auslösen zu können. Wenn sich nämlich der Magen verzögert entleert und gleichzeitig vermehrt Gallensäure in den Magen zurückfließt, kann dies die Entstehung eines Magengeschwürs begünstigen. Eine erhöhte Ulkus-Neigung beobachtet man auch bei Menschen, die nur verminderte Mengen jenes Eiweißes produzieren, das die Magenschleimhaut repariert.

Der Magen ist ein Hohlmuskel und innen mit einer Schleimhaut ausgekleidet. Sie schützt den Magen vor der Magensäure. Für die Verdauung werden im Magen Nahrung und Magensäure miteinander vermengt und durch Muskelarbeit weiter Richtung Darm befördert.

Besiedelung mit Helicobacter plyori: Dieses Bakterium, dem die aggressive Magensäure nichts ausmacht, ist der Hauptauslöser für ein Magengeschwür. Bei 75 Prozent aller Patienten mit einem Magengeschwür und bei bis zu 99 Prozent aller Patienten mit einem Zwölffingerdarmgeschwür lässt sich das Bakterium nachweisen. Der Magenkeim ist aber nicht allein für ein Ulkus verantwortlich. Erst in Kombination mit anderen Risikofaktoren kann es zur Geschwürbildung kommen. Zu diesen Risikofaktoren zählen etwa die Einnahme bestimmter Medikamente und ungünstige Lebens- und Ernährungsgewohnheiten (siehe folgende Punkte).

Bei einer durch Bakterien ausgelösten Magenschleimhautentzündung wird die schützende Schleimschicht durch die Keime zerstört. Die Magensäure greift nun die Schleimhaut direkt an und ein Magengeschwür kann entstehen.

Einnahme von bestimmten Medikamenten: Besonders anfällig für ein Magengeschwür sind Menschen, die regelmäßig schmerz- und entzündungshemmende Medikamente aus der Gruppe der nichtsteroidalen Antiphlogistika (NSAID oder NSAR) einnehmen. Dazu gehören Wirkstoffe wie Acetylsalicylsäure (ASS), Ibuprofen und Diclofenac. Als besonders problematisch gilt die Kombination von Kortison (Glukokortikoiden) und nichtsteroidalen Antiphlogistika.

Ungünstige Ernährungs- und Lebensgewohnheiten: Rauchen, Alkohol und Kaffee steigern die Magensäureproduktion und erhöhen somit das Risiko für ein Magengeschwür. Auch bestimmte Lebensmittel (z. B. scharfe Speisen) können die Magenschleimhaut reizen. Was vertragen wird, ist individuell aber sehr unterschiedlich.

Genetische Vorbelastung: In manchen Familien kommen Magengeschwüre gehäuft vor. Das spricht für eine Beteiligung genetischer Faktoren bei der Geschwürbildung.

Andere Ursachen: Magengeschwüre können sehr selten auch durch Stoffwechselerkrankungen wie eine Überfunktion der Nebenschilddrüse (Hyperparathyreoidismus) oder eine Tumorerkrankung (Gastrinom Zollinger-Ellison-Syndrom) verursacht werden. Auch nach großen Operationen, Unfällen oder Verbrennungen können Magengeschwüre entstehen. Da in diesen Situationen verschiedene „Stressreaktionen“ im Körper ablaufen, bezeichnet man ein solches Magengeschwür auch als Stressulkus. Darüber hinaus sind Menschen ab dem 65. Lebensjahr und solche mit der Blutgruppe 0 anfälliger für Magengeschwüre. Zudem kann sich bei Menschen, die bereits einmal ein solches Geschwür hatten, leicht ein neues bilden.


  • 0
  • 1
  • 2
  • 4
  • 5
  • 7
  • A.
  • B.
  • C.
  • D.
  • E.
  • F.
  • G
  • H
  • I.
  • J
  • K
  • L.
  • M.
  • N
  • O
  • P.
  • Q
  • R.
  • S.
  • T
  • U
  • V
  • W.
  • X
  • Y
  • Z

Serag-Wiessner GmbH & Co. KG

Serag-Wiessner GmbH & Co. KG

Serag-Wiessner GmbH & Co. KG

FRESENIUS KABI Deutschland GmbH

FRESENIUS KABI Deutschland GmbH

Dr. Franz Köhler Chemie GmbH

medac Gesellschaft für klinische Spezialpräparate mbH

medac Gesellschaft für klinische Spezialpräparate mbH

medac Gesellschaft für klinische Spezialpräparate mbH

medac Gesellschaft für klinische Spezialpräparate mbH

Pharma Gerke Arzneimittelvertriebs GmbH

Homöopathisches Laboratorium Alexander Pflüger GmbH & Co. KG

Teofarma S.R.I. Fabio Ferrara

Teofarma S.R.I. Fabio Ferrara

Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH

betapharm Arzneimittel GmbH

Glenmark Arzneimittel GmbH

Heumann Pharma GmbH & Co. Generica KG

Profi-Suche

Die Profi-Suche bietet genauere und erweiterte Suchoptionen nach Präparaten.

Identa-Suche

Mit der Identa-Suche können Sie Medikamente identifizieren und auf Teilbarkeit überprüfen.

Wirkstoffe von A bis Z

Über 10.000 Inhaltsstoffe mit Wirkstoff-Informationen und Präparate-Zuordnung.

Medikamente von A bis Z

Über 110.000 Arzneimittel und Medizinprodukte mit Anwendungs- und Fachinformationen.

Hersteller von A bis Z

Datenbank mit Informationen, Adressen und Präparaten der Pharma-Hersteller.

Die Vidal MMI Germany GmbH, Monzstraße 4, 63225 Langen, ist für den Geltungsbereich "Entwicklung, Vertrieb, Wartung und Support von Softwareprodukten im medizinischen Umfeld" nach ISO 9001:2015 durch die Zertifizierungsstelle der TÜV SÜD Management Service GmbH zertifiziert.


Cimetidine

If you have any comments on the content of this article, you can inform the editors by e-mail. We read your letter, but we ask for your understanding that we cannot answer every one.

Dr. Andrea Acker, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Heinrich Bremer, Berlin
Prof. Dr. Walter Dannecker, Hamburg
Prof. Dr. Hans-Günther Däßler, Freital
Dr. Claus-Stefan Dreier, Hamburg
Dr. Ulrich H. Engelhardt, Braunschweig
Dr. Andreas Fath, Heidelberg
Dr. Lutz-Karsten Finze, Grossenhain-Weßnitz
Dr. Rudolf Friedemann, Halle
Dr. Sandra Grande, Heidelberg
Prof. Dr. Carola Griehl, Halle
Prof. Dr. Gerhard Gritzner, Linz
Prof. Dr. Helmut Hartung, Halle
Prof. Dr. Peter Hellmold, Halle
Prof. Dr. Günter Hoffmann, Eberswalde
Prof. Dr. Hans-Dieter Jakubke, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Thomas M. Klapötke, Munich
Prof. Dr. Hans-Peter Kleber, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Reinhard Kramolowsky, Hamburg
Dr. Wolf Eberhard Kraus, Dresden
Dr. Günter Kraus, Halle
Prof. Dr. Ulrich Liebscher, Dresden
Dr. Wolfgang Liebscher, Berlin
Dr. Frank Meyberg, Hamburg
Prof. Dr. Peter Nuhn, Halle
Dr. Hartmut Ploss, Hamburg
Dr. Dr. Manfred Pulst, Leipzig
Dr. Anna Schleitzer, Marktschwaben
Prof. Dr. Harald Schmidt, Linz
Dr. Helmut Schmiers, Freiberg
Prof. Dr. Klaus Schulze, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Rüdiger Stolz, Jena
Prof. Dr. Rudolf Taube, Merseburg
Dr. Ralf Trapp, Wassenaar, NL
Dr. Martina Venschott, Hanover
Prof. Dr. Rainer Vulpius, Freiberg
Prof. Dr. Günther Wagner, Leipzig
Prof. Dr. Manfred Weissenfels, Dresden
Dr. Klaus-Peter Wendlandt, Merseburg
Prof. Dr. Otto Wienhaus, Tharandt


Summary

In patients in a surgical intensive care unit a controlled clinical trial was performed concerned with the pathophysiological functions of histamine in stress ulcer disease and with the influence of cimetidine prophylaxis on this complication. The commonly used organization of a controlled clinical trial was enforced to be changed by considerable theoretical, ethical and practical difficulties in designing and conducting the study:

Initially the trial was planned as randomized double-blind using a fixed sample size of patients obtained from the intensive care unit. It was executed as a sequential single-blind study only in patients with severe polytrauma. For ethical reasons it was stopped before the bounderies were reached and was analysed according to the advice of an external referee using Fisher's exact test (p<0.025).

The necessary informations about the trial could not be compressed to one single report. As one of several parts this article mainly deals with Design, Clinical materials, Methods and Statistics of the whole investigation. Distinctive sections on Theoretical and Ethical issues and on Historical development of the study were included. Numerous decisions were explained already in Materials and Methods to emphasize the enormous complexity of the decision process in clinical trials in contrast to that in most of the animal experiments.

In order to facilitate conclusions from our sample to the target population and to define subgroups of patients with a high risk for stress ulceration all 6,634 patients hospitalized in the Surgery Clinic during the time of the study were prospectively investigated for clinically manifest stress ulceration. Furthermore as one of the most important attributes the lethality rate was calculated for the whole group and various subgroups of trauma patients in our hospital.

As a surprising and remarkable result of the study clinically manifest stress ulcers occurred exclusively in our patients in the intensive care unit and among them mainly in those with severy polytrauma and postoperative complications. Cimetidine was highly effective in preventing stress ulceration in severe polytrauma patients. But it seems absolutely unnecessary to distribute this drug in all patients of a surgical intensive care unit like from a cornucopia of happiness.


Video: Cimetidine Made Simple (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Talal

    A fun time

  2. Brodrik

    I know a site with answers to a theme interesting you.

  3. Gardashakar

    Yes indeed. It was with me too. Let's discuss this issue. Here or at PM.

  4. Memphis

    the Infinite discussion :)

  5. Fell

    Really even when I didn't think about it before

  6. Moogurn

    It is the precious phrase



Write a message